Privacy and social spaces: An introduction

Natália da Silva Perez*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
18 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In this introductory text to the special issue Regulating Access: Privacy and the Private in Early Modern Dutch Contexts, Natália da Silva Perez argues that privacy can be a productive analytical lens to examine the social history of the Dutch Republic. She starts by providing an overview of theoretical definitions of privacy and of the 'private versus public' dichotomy, highlighting their implications for the study of society. Next, she discusses the modern view of privacy as a legally protected right, explaining that we must adjust expectations when applying the concept to historical examination: in the early modern period, privacy was not yet fully incorporated within a legal framework, although it was a widespread need across different echelons of society. She provides a historical overview of this widespread need for privacy through instances where people attempted to regulate access to their material and immaterial resources. Finally, she describes how the four articles in this special issue contribute to our understanding of the role of privacy in early modern Dutch life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-16
Number of pages12
JournalTijdschrift voor Sociale en Economische Geschiedenis
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Nov 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
1 This research was funded by the Danish ?ational Research Foundation (D?RF 138). 2 ?ichael S. A. Graziano, The spaces between us. A story of neuroscience, evolution, and human nature (?ew York 2018); Stephen T. ?argulis, ‘Privacy as a social issue and behavioral concept’, Journal ofSocial Issues 59:2 (2003) 243-261, https://doi.org/10.1111/1540-4560.00063; Irwin Altman, The environment and social behavior. Privacy, personal space, territory, crowding (Pacific Grove 1975). 3 Patricia S. Churchland, Braintrust. What neuroscience tells us about morality (Princeton 2011).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Netherlands Institute of International Relations. All rights reserved.

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