Psychological factors are more strongly associated with pain than radiographic severity in non-invasively treated first carpometacarpal osteoarthritis

Lisa Hoogendam*, Mark J.W. van der Oest, Jonathan Tsehaie, Robbert M. Wouters, Guus M. Vermeulen, Harm Slijper, Ruud Selles, Jarry Porsius, the Hand-Wrist Study Group

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent psychological factors are related to pain levels prior to non-invasive treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint. 

Methods: We included patients (n = 255) at the start of non-invasive treatment for osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint who completed the Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire. Psychological distress, pain catastrophizing behavior and illness perception was measured. X-rays were scored on presence of scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis. We used hierarchical linear regression analysis to determine to what extent pain levels could be explained by patient characteristics, X-ray scores, and psychological factors. 

Results: Patient characteristics and X-ray scores accounted for only 6% of the variation in pre-treatment pain levels. After adding the psychological factors to our model, 47% of the variance could be explained. 

Conclusions: Our results show that psychological factors are more strongly related to pain levels prior to non-invasive treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint than patient characteristics and X-ray scores, which implies the important role of these factors in the reporting of symptoms. More research is needed to determine whether psychological factors will also affect treatment outcomes for patients treated non-invasively for osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint. 


IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Pain is the most important complaint for patients with osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint. Psychological factors are strongly associated with pain levels prior to treatment. Pain catastrophizing behavior appears to be a promising target for complementary treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1897-1902
Number of pages6
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation
Volume43
Issue number13
Early online date8 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank all patients who participated and allowed their data to be anonymously used for the present study. The members of the Hand-Wrist Study Group are Arjen Blomme, Berbel Sluijter, Corinne Schouten, Dirk-Jan van der Avoort, Erik Walbeehm, Gijs van Couwelaar, Guus Vermeulen, Hans de Schipper, Hans Temming, Jeroen van Uchelen, Luitzen de Boer, Nicoline de Haas, Oliver Z?phel, Reinier Feitz, Sebastiaan Souer, Steven Hovius, Thybout Moojen, Xander Smit, Rob van Huis, Pierre-Yves Pennehouat, Karin Schoneveld, Yara van Kooij, Robbert Wouters, Paul Zagt, Folkert van Ewijk, Frederik Moussault, Rik van Houwelingen, Joris Veltkamp, Arenda te Velde, Alexandra Fink, Harm Slijper, Ruud Selles, Jarry Porsius, Kim Spekreijse, Chao Zhou, Jonathan Tsehaie, Ralph Poelstra, Miguel Janssen, Mark van der Oest, Stefanie Evers, Jak Dekker, Matijs de Jong, Jasper van Gestel, Marloes ter Stege, Menno Dekker, Roel Faber, Frank Santegoets, Monique Sieber-Rasch, and Ton Gerritsen.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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