Psychometric Properties of Psychosexual Functioning Survey Among Autistic and Non-autistic Adults: Adapting the Self-Report Teen Transition Inventory to the U.S. Context

Xihan Yang*, Linda Dekker, Kirstin Greaves-Lord, Eileen T Crehan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Psychosexual functioning is an important aspect of human development and relationships. A previous study investigated psychosexual functioning of autistic adolescents using the Teen Transition Inventory (TTI), but there is a lack of comprehensive measurement of psychosexual functioning among autistic and non-autistic (NA) adults. To address this gap, the current study adapted the self-report TTI to the Psychosexual Functioning Survey (PSFS) and presented it to 131 autistic (n = 59) and NA adults (n = 72) in the U.S. Comparisons of psychometric properties between the original TTI and the PSFS are shared; the developmental relevancy among some items was changed, and the alphas indicated a difference in the content of certain scales. Differences emerged between autistic and NA adults in both the intra- and interpersonal domains of psychosexual functioning, but not in sexual and intimate behaviors. The findings suggest the persistence of differences from adolescence to adulthood between autistic and NA people and highlight the importance of understanding the unique experiences of adults in psychosexual functioning relative to diagnostic status.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Nov 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Research programs

  • ESSB PSY

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