Psychosexual functioning of cognitively-able adolescents with autism spectrum disorder compared to typically developing peers: The development and testing of the teen transition inventory- a self- and parent report questionnaire on psychosexual functioning

Linda P. Dekker*, Esther J.M. van der Vegt, Jan Van der Ende, Nouchka Tick, Anneke Louwerse, Athanasios Maras, Frank C. Verhulst, Kirstin Greaves-Lord

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

To gain further insight into psychosexual functioning, including behaviors, intrapersonal and interpersonal aspects, in adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), comprehensive, multi-informant measures are needed. This study describes (1) the development of a new measure of psychosexual functioning in both parentand self-reports (Teen Transition Inventory; TTI) covering all three domains of psychosexual functioning (i.e. psychosexual socialization, psychosexual selfhood, and sexual/ intimate behavior). And (2) the initial testing of this instrument, comparing adolescents with ASD (n = 79 parentreport; n = 58 self-report) to Typically Developing (TD) adolescents (n = 131 parent-report; n = 91 self-report) while taking into account gender as a covariate. Results from both informants indicate more difficulties regarding psychosexual socialization and psychosexual selfhood in the ASD group. With regard to sexual/intimate behavior, only parents reported significantly more problems in adolescents with ASD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1716-1738
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume47
Issue number6
Early online date16 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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