Quaranteens: Prepandemic relationship quality and changes in adolescent internalizing problems during the COVID-19 pandemic

Kirsten L. Buist*, Savannah Boele, Anne Bülow, Ellen Reitz, Marjolein Verhoeven, Loes Keijsers

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
23 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This preregistered longitudinal study examined changes in adolescents' depressive and anxiety symptoms before and during the COVID-19 pandemic using latent additive piece-wise growth models. It also assessed whether support from and conflict with mothers, fathers, siblings, and best friends explained heterogeneity in change patterns. One hundred and ninety-two Dutch adolescents (Mean age: 14.3 years; 68.8% female) completed online biweekly questionnaires for a year (November 2019–October 2020), consisting of a prepandemic, lockdown, and reopening phase. Depressive symptoms increased following the lockdown and decreased upon reopening. Anxiety symptoms showed an immediate decrease followed by a gradual increase in the reopening phase. Prepandemic family and best friend support and conflict did not explain heterogeneity in depressive and anxiety symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1164-1178
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume33
Issue number4
Early online date7 Jun 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The study and the data of “One Size Does Not Fit All” was funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO‐VIDI; ADAPT; Assessing the Dynamics between Adaptation and Parenting in Teens 452–17‐011) awarded to Loes Keijsers.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Research on Adolescence.

Research programs

  • ESSB PED

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