Recommendations for the introduction of metagenomic next-generation sequencing in clinical virology, part II: bioinformatic analysis and reporting

Jutte J.C. de Vries*, Julianne R. Brown, Natacha Couto, Martin Beer, Philippe Le Mercier, Igor Sidorov, Anna Papa, Nicole Fischer, Bas B. Oude Munnink, Christophe Rodriquez, Maryam Zaheri, Arzu Sayiner, Mario Hönemann, Alba Perez Cataluna, Ellen C. Carbo, Claudia Bachofen, Jakub Kubacki, Dennis Schmitz, Katerina Tsioka, Sébastien MatamorosDirk Höper, Marta Hernandez, Elisabeth Puchhammer-Stöckl, Aitana Lebrand, Michael Huber, Peter Simmonds, Eric C.J. Claas, F. Xavier López-Labrador

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) is an untargeted technique for determination of microbial DNA/RNA sequences in a variety of sample types from patients with infectious syndromes. mNGS is still in its early stages of broader translation into clinical applications. To further support the development, implementation, optimization and standardization of mNGS procedures for virus diagnostics, the European Society for Clinical Virology (ESCV) Network on Next-Generation Sequencing (ENNGS) has been established. The aim of ENNGS is to bring together professionals involved in mNGS for viral diagnostics to share methodologies and experiences, and to develop application guidelines. Following the ENNGS publication Recommendations for the introduction of mNGS in clinical virology, part I: wet lab procedure in this journal, the current manuscript aims to provide practical recommendations for the bioinformatic analysis of mNGS data and reporting of results to clinicians.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104812
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume138
Early online date2 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

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© 2021

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