Relapsing low-flow alarms due to suboptimal alignment of the left ventricular assist device inflow cannula

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This retrospective study investigated the correlation between the angular position of the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) inflow cannula and relapsing low-flow alarms. METHODS: Medical charts were reviewed of all patients with HeartMate 3 LVAD support for relapsing low-flow alarms. A standardized protocol was created to measure the angular position with a contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Statistics were done using a gamma frailty model with a constant rate function. RESULTS: For this analysis, 48 LVAD-supported patients were included. The majority of the patients were male (79%) with a median age of 57 years and a median follow-up of 30 months (interquartile range: 19-41). Low-flow alarm(s) were experienced in 30 (63%) patients. Angulation towards the septal-lateral plane showed a significant increase in low-flow alarms over time with a constant rate function of 0.031 increase in low-flow alarms per month of follow-up per increasing degree of angulation (P = 0.048). When dividing this group using an optimal cut-off point, a significant increase in low-flow alarms was observed when the septal-lateral angulation was 28° or more (P = 0.001). Anterior-posterior and maximal inflow cannula angulation did not show a significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed an increasing number of low-flow alarms when the degrees of LVAD inflow cannula expand towards the septal-lateral plane. This emphasizes the importance of the LVAD inflow cannula angular position to prevent relapsing low-flow alarms with the risk of diminished quality of life and morbidity.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberezac415
JournalEuropean journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

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