Religious responses to existential insecurity: Conflict intensity in the region of birth increases praying among refugees

Frank van Tubergen, Yuliya Kosyakova*, Agnieszka Kanas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

30 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Do violent conflicts increase religiosity? This study draws on evidence from a large-scale survey among refugees from Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria in Germany linked with data on time-varying conflict intensity in refugees' birth regions before the survey interview. The results show that the greater the number of conflict-induced fatalities in the period before the interview, the more often refugees pray. The relationship between conflict and praying holds equally across demographic subgroups. Evidence suggests that both short- and long-term cumulative fatalities in refugees' birth regions affect how often they pray. Additionally, the link between conflict and praying is stronger for refugees with family and relatives still living in their country of origin. Finally, we show that the conflicts that matter are those occurring within the refugees’ specific region of birth rather than in other regions in the country. Implications for existential insecurity theory and cultural evolutionary theory are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102895
JournalSocial Science Research
Volume113
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We would like to thank Marita Selig for her assistance in the preparation of the data for the study.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Authors

Research programs

  • ESSB PA

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Religious responses to existential insecurity: Conflict intensity in the region of birth increases praying among refugees'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this