Replaying Wartime Résistance? Studying Ludic Memory-Making in the Open World Game The Saboteur: Studying Ludic Memory-Making in the Open World Game The Saboteur

Pieter van den Heede*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
43 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Ever since the emergence of digital gaming as a popular pastime, the Second World War has been one of its major sources of inspiration. This article contributes to the study of the memory-making potential of historical digital entertainment games, by offering an analysis of The Saboteur, an American game that is set in France during the Second World War and that offers a depiction of an explorable open game world occupied by the Nazi regime. Through an analysis of a game's paratextual positioning, its ludic social discourse, and instances of perceived ludonarrative dissonance from a historical and cultural memory perspective, the article concludes that the game offers a romanticized representation of male violent resistance against the Nazi occupier who is depicted as Manichaeistically evil and a-historically violent. This representation equally reconfirms the dominant cultural memory narratives formulated in France and the United States during and immediately after the war.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalGames and Culture
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2023.

Research programs

  • ESHCC HIS

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