Revisiting longer-term health effects of informal caregiving: Evidence from the UK

Jannis Stöckel*, Judith Bom

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)
61 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

We estimate the longer-term and dynamic effects of providing informal care on caregivers’ health in the United Kingdom. Using propensity score matching to address the endogeneity of informal care provision, we estimate static and sequential matching models exploring health effects at the extensive and intensive margin of informal caregiving and their persistence for up to five years. Our results suggest substantial negative health effects confined to the mental domain and asymmetrically experienced by caregivers providing more than 20 hours of weekly care. Further, our dynamic sequential matching results indicate that for caregivers providing multiple years of higher intensity care the negative effects persist.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100343
JournalJournal of the Economics of Ageing
Volume21
Early online date13 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We gratefully acknowledge comments provided by Cameron Birchall, Joaquim Vidiella-Martin, Sara Rellstab, Pieter Bakx, Eddy van Doorslaer, Erik Schut, Job van Exel, and Werner Brouwer, participants at the LSE Care Policy Evaluation Centre seminar, the KU Leuven Public Economics seminar, the 2019 lowlands Health Economic Study Group, the 2019 UK Health Economists’ Study Group summer meeting, the 2019 International Health Economics Congress and the ESE/ESHPM PhD Research Symposium. This study received financial support from the Network for Studies on Pensions, Ageing and Retirement Grant optimal saving and insurance for old age: The role of public-long term care insurance (Bom) and the Erasmus Initiative Smarter Choices for Better Health of the Erasmus University Rotterdam (Stöckel). All remaining errors are our own.

Funding Information:
We gratefully acknowledge comments provided by Cameron Birchall, Joaquim Vidiella-Martin, Sara Rellstab, Pieter Bakx, Eddy van Doorslaer, Erik Schut, Job van Exel, and Werner Brouwer, participants at the LSE Care Policy Evaluation Centre seminar, the KU Leuven Public Economics seminar, the 2019 lowlands Health Economic Study Group, the 2019 UK Health Economists’ Study Group summer meeting, the 2019 International Health Economics Congress and the ESE/ESHPM PhD Research Symposium. This study received financial support from the Network for Studies on Pensions, Ageing and Retirement Grant optimal saving and insurance for old age: The role of public-long term care insurance (Bom) and the Erasmus Initiative Smarter Choices for Better Health of the Erasmus University Rotterdam (Stöckel). All remaining errors are our own.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Author(s)

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