Self-efficacy and coping style in relation to psychological distress and quality of life in informal caregivers of patients with head and neck cancer: a longitudinal study

Kira S. van Hof*, Arta Hoesseini, Irma M. Verdonck-de Leeuw, Femke Jansen, C. René Leemans, Robert P. Takes, Chris H.J. Terhaard, Robert J. Baatenburg de Jong, Aniel Sewnaik, Marinella P.J. Offerman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: In order to understand how informal caregivers of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients deal with the consequences of the disease, we investigated their self-efficacy and coping style in relation to symptoms of anxiety and depression (distress) and quality of life (QoL) over time. In addition, factors associated with self-efficacy and coping style were investigated. Methods: A total of 222 informal caregivers and their related HNC patients were prospectively followed as part from the multicenter cohort NETherlands QUality of life and Biomedical cohort studies In Cancer (NET-QUBIC). Self-efficacy and coping style were measured at baseline, and distress and QoL at baseline and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. Results: Informal caregivers had a high level of self-efficacy comparable with patients. Caregivers used “seeking social support,” “passive reacting,” and “expression of emotions” more often than patients. Factors associated with self-efficacy and coping were higher age and lower education. Higher self-efficacy was related with better QoL and “active tackling” was associated with less depression symptoms. “Passive reacting” and “expression of emotions” were associated with higher psychological distress and reduced QoL. Conclusion: Among informal caregivers of HNC patients, higher self-efficacy and “active tackling” were associated with better functioning over time, while “passive reacting” and “expression of negative emotions” were associated with worse functioning. Awareness of the differences in self-efficacy skills and coping and their relationship with QoL and psychological distress will help clinicians to identify caregivers that may benefit from additional support that improve self-efficacy and “active tackling” and reduce negative coping styles.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jan 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Dutch Cancer Society, Grant/Award Number: VU 2013–5930.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023, The Author(s).

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Self-efficacy and coping style in relation to psychological distress and quality of life in informal caregivers of patients with head and neck cancer: a longitudinal study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this