Shall we all unmute? A conversation analysis of participation in online reflection sessions for general practitioners in training

Marije Van Braak*, Mike Huiskes, Sven Schaepkens, Mario Veen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has induced many changes to education in many contexts. In this study, we describe how general practitioners in training (residents) accomplish participation in collaborative reflection sessions conducted on Zoom. In this online setting, taking part in interactions is understood to be crucial to the creation of educational value. To study forms of participation used on Zoom, we recorded three group reflection sessions and examined them with Conversation Analysis. We focused on how participation is shaped by and is contingent upon the affordances of the online environment. Our analyses show that participants explicitly orient to the interactional accomplishment of participation in frameworks that change in the various phases of case discussion. Participants establish new procedures to deal with both familiar and sometimes new problems of participation introduced by the online environment. We describe these procedures in detail to contribute to the understanding of the accomplishment of participation through situated practices such as embodied talk-in-interaction. The findings can serve training purposes in online education across both medical and non-medical curricula.

Original languageEnglish
Article number72
Pages (from-to)NA
JournalLanguages
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Apr 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

This article belongs to the Special Issue Institutional Discourse and the Covid-19 Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities)

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