Strength of small-bites abdominal wall closure using different suturing methods and materials in an experimental animal model

M. Allaeys*, L. Visscher, F. P.J. den Hartog, P. Dries, P. J. Tanis, H. P. Theeuwes, F. Berrevoet, H. H. Eker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: 

Using small instead of large bites for laparotomy closure results in lower incidence of incisional hernia, but no consensus exists on which suture material to use. This study aimed to compare five different closure strategies in a standardized experimental setting. 

Methods: 

Fifty porcine abdominal walls were arranged into 5 groups: (A) running 2/0 polydioxanone; (B) interlocking 2/0 polydioxanone; (C) running size 0 barbed polydioxanone; (D) running size 0 barbed glycolic acid and trimethylene carbonate; (E) running size 0 suturable polypropylene mesh. The small-bites technique was used for linea alba closure in all. The abdominal walls were divided into a supra- and infra-umbilical half, resulting in 20 specimens per group that were pulled apart in a tensile testing machine. Maximum tensile force and types of suture failure were registered. 

Results: 

The highest tensile force was measured when using barbed polydioxanone (334.8 N ± 157.0), but differences did not reach statistical significance. Infra-umbilical abdominal walls endured a significantly higher maximum tensile force compared to supra-umbilical (397 N vs 271 N, p < 0.001). Barbed glycolic acid and trimethylene carbonate failed significantly more often (25% vs 0%, p = 0.008).

Conclusion: 

Based on tensile force, both interlocking and running suture techniques using polydioxanone, and running sutures using barbed polydioxanone or suturable mesh, seem to be suitable for abdominal wall closure. Tensile strength was significantly higher in infra-umbilical abdominal walls compared to supra-umbilical. Barbed glycolic acid and trimethylene carbonate should probably be discouraged for fascial closure, because of increased risk of suture failure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)527-535
Number of pages9
JournalHernia
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag France SAS, part of Springer Nature 2024.

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