Study-related wellbeing, behavior, and attitudes of university students in the Netherlands during emergency remote teaching in the context of COVID-19: A longitudinal study

Manja Vollmann*, Renée A. Scheepers, Anna P. Nieboer, Femke Hilverda

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
59 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction: During the COVID-19 pandemic, emergency remote teaching was implemented at all conventional Dutch universities; however, the degree of limitations in on-campus teaching and learning varied during the pandemic dependent on the strictness of the measures. In the present study, it will be investigated how study-related experiences of university students changed in the face of varying limitations in on-campus teaching and learning. Methods: The study had a longitudinal natural experiment design with three points of measurement during the academic year 2020–2021: November–December 2020 (t1; campuses partially open), March 2021 (t2; campuses fully closed) and June–July 2021 (t3; campuses partially open). In total, 680 Dutch university students (65.9% female; age: M = 21 years, SD = 2.06) filled in online surveys measuring study-related wellbeing (academic burnout and study-engagement), study-related behavior (study effort), and study-related attitudes (education satisfaction, online self-efficacy, and attitudes toward online education). Results: Overall, students reported moderate levels of academic burnout, study engagement, study effort, education satisfaction, and online self-efficacy; their attitudes toward online education were rather negative. Students’ study-related wellbeing and education satisfaction decreased in the period when on-campus teaching and learning was impossible (t2) compared to periods in which on-campus teaching and learning was possible at a low level with several restrictions (t1 and t3). Students’ attitudes toward online education and online self-efficacy slightly increased at the end of the academic year (t3); however, the attitudes toward online education remained negative. Discussion: The findings indicate that students’ academic burnout, study engagement, and education satisfaction varied over the course of the academic year in the context of changing limitations in on-campus teaching and learning. To facilitate positive study-related experiences, universities are advised to offer as much on-campus education as possible in times of pandemics.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1056983
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by a grant provided by the Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (ZonMw; grant no. 10430 03201 0023).

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2022 Vollmann, Scheepers, Nieboer and Hilverda.

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