Systemic diseases and the risk of developing salivary stones: a case control study

Saskia Kraaij, K Hakki Karagozoglu, Yvonne A G Kenter, Justin Pijpe, Marjolijn Gilijamse, Henk S Brand*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the possible relationship between the presence of salivary stones and systemic diseases, medication, smoking, and alcohol consumption.

STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective, case control study. Medical records of patients with salivary stones and those of control patients without salivary stones were retrospectively reviewed. Data regarding the affected salivary gland, the presence of systemic disease, and the use of medication, tobacco, and alcohol were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher Exact tests.

RESULTS: Medical records of 208 patients with salivary stones and those of 208 control patients were reviewed. Of the patients diagnosed with salivary stones, the submandibular gland was affected in 85.6% of the patients, the parotid gland in 9.6%, and the sublingual gland in 2.4% of the patients. None of the recorded systemic diseases was more prevalent in patients with salivary stones. Patients with salivary stones used significantly more antibiotics compared with the control group (P = .037). No significant differences were observed for other types of medication. There was no correlation between salivary stone formation, smoking, and alcohol consumption.

CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggested that systemic diseases, medication, smoking, and alcohol consumption play no or only a limited role in the onset of salivary stones.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)539-43
Number of pages5
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology
Volume119
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2015
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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