Taking care of business: The routines and rationales of early-career musicians in the Dutch and British music industries

Rick Everts*, J Haynes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article explores a small sample of musicians in two European musical contexts – the Netherlands and the UK. It examines the relationship between the conditions of national music industries and the strategies used to negotiate a career in music and the extent to which musicians frame their careers as entrepreneurs. Interview data from two projects with early-career musicians form the basis of our secondary comparative analysis. We argue that their strategizing can be framed as a set of responses to their local structural conditions. However, neither set of responses produces market advantage. Instead, traditional power and economic relations that reinforce the logic of the hegemonic mainstream industry tend to prevail, whereby only a very small fraction of the aspiring musicians can sustain themselves financially in music.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)731-748
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Cultural Studies
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Apr 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: The Dutch study upon which this work draws was supported as part of the project Staging Popular Music: Researching Sustainable Live Music Ecologies for Artists, Music Venues and Cities (POPLIVE) by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) and the Taskforce for Applied Research (NRPO-SIA) (grant number 314-99-202, research programme Smart Culture – Arts and Culture). Partners in this project are Mojo Concerts and the Association of Dutch Pop Music Venues and Festivals (VNPF).

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: The Dutch study upon which this work draws was supported as part of the project Staging Popular Music: Researching Sustainable Live Music Ecologies for Artists, Music Venues and Cities (POPLIVE) by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) and the Taskforce for Applied Research (NRPO-SIA) (grant number 314-99-202, research programme Smart Culture ? Arts and Culture). Partners in this project are Mojo Concerts and the Association of Dutch Pop Music Venues and Festivals (VNPF). The British study (Digital Entrepreneurs: Negotiating Commerce and Creativity in the ?New? Music Industry) received financial support for the research, authorship, and publication of this article from the British Academy small grants scheme, ref. SG122392. Thanks to Lee Marshall (Principal Investigator) and to Ellen Kirkpatrick for collaboration on the original project.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2021.

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