The association of specific industry-related air pollution with occurrence of chronic diseases: A register-based study

Arnold D. Bergstra*, Jasper V. Been, Alex Burdorf

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
31 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Air pollution may contribute to onset and progression of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Most studies have focused on the contribution of traffic-related exposure to PM10 or PM2.5. Our aim was to investigate the association of different components of industry-related air pollution on the occurrence of chronic diseases. A register-based repeated cross-sectional study was conducted among 89,714 subjects (2012) with 536,599 annual observations (2012–2017) living in the vicinity of a large industrial area in the Netherlands. Information from the dispensed medication registration was linked with a dispersion model to characterize annual individual-level exposure of all subjects at place of residence. Associations between annual exposure (concentration and duration) to particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen oxides (NOX), sulphur dioxide (SO2), and volatile organic compounds (VOC) with annual dispensed medication for cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory conditions were investigated by multivariate logistic regression analysis with generalized estimating equations (GEE) while controlling for confounders. Exposure to PM10 and to NOX (per μg/m3) were significantly associated with medication for cardiovascular diseases (OR 1.06, 95CI% 1.06–1.06 and OR 1.01, 95%CI 1.01–1.01 respectively). Exposures to PM10 and SO2 (per μg/m3) were significantly associated with medication for inflammatory conditions (OR 1.05, 95%CI 1.00–1.09 and OR 1.07, 95%CI 1.01–1.14 respectively). Exposure to SO2 was inversely associated with respiratory diseases (OR 0.91, 95%CI 0.86–0.97). Except for inflammatory conditions, exposure duration (years) was significantly associated with the other three chronic diseases (OR varying from 1.01 to 1.03). This study indicates that specific air pollution components caused by industry may contribute to the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number112872
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume209
Early online date7 Feb 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was partly supported by the Academic Collaborative Center for Environmental Health under Grant 210118-0028 . The funder had no role in study.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors

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