The burden of disease of fatal and non-fatal burn injuries for the full spectrum of care in the Netherlands

Inge Spronk*, Margriet E. van Baar, Robert A. Verheij, Martien J. Panneman, Jan Dokter, Suzanne Polinder, Juanita A. Haagsma

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Background: A comprehensive overview of the burden of disease of burns for the full spectrum of care is not available. Therefore, we estimated the burden of disease of burns for the full spectrum in the Netherlands in 2018, and explored whether the burden of disease changed over the past 5 years (2014-2018). Methods: Data were collected at four levels: general practice, emergency department, hospital, and mortality data. For each level, years lived with disability (YLD), years of life lost (YLL), and disability-adjusted life-years (DALY) were estimated using a tailored methodology. Results: Burns resulted in a total of 9278 DALYs in the Netherlands in 2018, comprising of 7385 YLDs (80%) and 1892 YLLs (20%). Burn patients who visited the general practice contributed most DALYs (64%), followed by deceased burn patients (20%), burn patients admitted to hospital (14%) and those treated at the emergency department (2%). The burden of disease was comparable in both sexes (4734 DALYs (51%) for females; 4544 DALYs (49%) for males), though the distribution of DALYs by level of care varied; females contributed more DALYs at the general practice level, and males at all other levels of care. Among children boys 0-4 years had the highest burden of disease (784 DALYs (9%)), and among adults, females 18-34 years old (1319 DALYs (14.2%)) had the highest burden of disease. Between 2014 and 2018 there was a marginal increase of 0.8% in the number of DALYs. Conclusions: Burns cause a substantial burden of disease, with burns requiring care at the general practice level contributing most DALYs. Information on burden of burns by the full level of care as well as by subgroup is important for the development of tailored burn prevention strategies, and the updated figures are recommended to be used for priority setting and resource allocation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3
JournalArchives of Public Health
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jan 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by The Dutch Burn Foundation (grant number: 19.106). The funding body had no role in any part of the study.

Publisher Copyright: © 2023, The Author(s).

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