The effectiveness of metacognitive therapy in comparison to exposure and response prevention for obsessive-compulsive disorder: A randomized controlled trial

Kim Melchior*, Colin van der Heiden, Mathijs Deen, Birgit Mayer, Ingmar H.A. Franken

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background: The recommended psychological treatment of choice for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is exposure with response prevention (ERP). Although this treatment is quite effective, recovery rates are modest and attrition rate is relatively high. Also, ERP treatment requires amounts of therapist time. A possible way to improve OCD treatment is by taking into account key cognitive processes involved in the development and maintenance of the disorder. The metacognitive model is such an account and pilot findings suggest that the associated metacognitive therapy (MCT) might be an effective treatment for OCD. Methods: In the present study, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) is used to assess the effectiveness of MCT in comparison to ERP in an outpatient clinical sample of patients with OCD. Results: Both MCT and ERP produced significant pre-treatment to post-treatment decreases in obsessive-compulsive, comorbid psychological symptoms and metacognitive beliefs, both with moderate to large within-group effect sizes and high proportions of significant clinical change. Drop-out rates were low and treatment gains were maintained at six-month follow-up. There were no differences in efficacy observed between MCT and ERP treatments. Conclusions: MCT proves to be a promising treatment of OCD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100780
JournalJournal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders
Volume36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright: © 2023 Elsevier Inc.

Research programs

  • ESSB PSY

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