The impact of remote work and mediated communication frequency on isolation and psychological distress

Ward van Zoonen*, Anu Sivunen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

60 Citations (Scopus)
175 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

A massive shift towards remote work practices has presented many organizations and employees with acute challenges associated with multi-locational work. This shift underscores the need to reconsider isolation as one of the focal challenges of organizations in an era of increasingly dispersed and mediated work practices. This study relies on a three-wave survey among Finnish workers to investigate how remote work practices and the use of information and communication technology (ICT) have impacted perceptions of isolation during the global health pandemic, and whether these relationships have an effect on psychological distress. The findings indicate that facilitating the use of ICTs may help organizations and employees combat isolation, while simultaneous increases in remote work practices lead employees to feel more isolated. In addition, the findings highlight a reciprocal effect between psychological distress and isolation, suggesting that strain may both increase perceptions of isolation and be a result of being isolated.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
Early online date2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Nov 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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