The prevalence of incidental findings on pelvis MRI of 8-13-year-old children

Desiree K. de Vreede*, Johannes H. J. M. Bessems, Marjolein H. G. Dremmen, Meike W. Vernooij, Aad van der Lugt, Edwin H. G. Oei

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The prevalence and clinical relevance of incidental findings (IF(s)) on imaging assessing the pelvis in children has not been well documented.

METHODS: Three-thousand two-hundred thirty-one children (mean age 10.2 (range 8.6-12.9) years) were evaluated with MRI of the hips, pelvis, and lumbar spine, as part of a prospective population-based pediatric cohort study. Scans were reviewed by trained medical staff for abnormalities. IFs were categorized by clinical relevance and need for further clinical evaluation.

RESULTS: 8.3% (n = 267) of children featured at least one IF. One or more musculoskeletal IFs were found in 7.9% (n = 254) of children, however, only 0.8% (n = 2) of musculoskeletal IFs required clinical evaluation. Most frequent abnormalities were simple bone cysts 6.0% (n = 195), chondroid lesions 0.6% (n = 20), and perineural cysts 0.5% (n = 15). Intra-abdominal IFs were detected in 0.5% (n = 17) of children, with over half (n = 9) of these requiring evaluation. The three most common intra-abdominal IFs were a duplex collecting system 0.09% (n = 3), significant ascites 0.06% (n = 2), and hydroureteronephrosis 0.06% (n = 2).

CONCLUSIONS: IFs on MRI of the lower abdominal and hip region are relatively common in children aged 8-13 years, most of these can be confidently categorized as clinically irrelevant without the need for additional clinical or radiologic follow up.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Research
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Oct 2022

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to the International Pediatric Research Foundation, Inc 2022

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