The Putative Effect of Identity on Extremist Radicalization: A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies

Lea Echelmeyer*, Anne Marie Slotboom, Frank Weerman

*Corresponding author for this work

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1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Despite its prominence in radicalization models, we lack an integrated understanding of how, when, and to what extent identity causes or prevents extremist radicalization. In this systematic review we therefore inventoried the various conceptualizations of identity as determinant of extremist radicalization in quantitative research, and evaluated their effect. Synthesis of 75 studies revealed that the majority examined social and contextual identity concepts, around a quarter investigated identity needs and motives, and only two tested personal and developmental identity concepts. While the link between some identity concepts and extremism enjoy good empirical support, many are in need of further scrutiny.

Original languageEnglish
JournalStudies in Conflict and Terrorism
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Aug 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding: This work was supported by the Nationaal Regieorgaan Onderwijsonderzoek (NRO) and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Research programs

  • SAI 2005-04 MSS

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