The transition from development and disaster risk reduction to humanitarian relief: the case of Yemen during high-intensity conflict

Rodrigo Mena*, Dorothea Hilhorst

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Discussions on how humanitarian aid and disaster responses can link better with development and disaster risk reduction (DRR) have occurred for decades. However, the reverse transition, from development to relief, is still poorly understood. Using the case of Yemen, this study analyses whether and how development and DRR activities adapted to the emerging humanitarian crisis when conflict escalated in the country. It concentrates on governance strategies, actors, challenges, and opportunities at the nexus of development, disaster, and humanitarian responses. Semi-structured interviews and focus-group discussions with aid and societal actors were conducted remotely and in Jordan. The findings show gaps in knowledge and coordination in the movement from development and DRR to relief, but also reveal spaces and opportunities to advance towards enhanced integration of action before, during, and after an emergency. This paper contributes to the literature on this nexus and critically argues for a more integrated approach to conflicts and disasters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1049-1074
Number of pages26
JournalDisasters
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2022

Bibliographical note

Acknowledgements
We would like to thank the numerous people and institutions that shared their knowledge and experiences with us. Special thanks go to Yousef Qutary, for his support
during the whole research process and for feedback provided on this paper. This
work was supported by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (grant
number 453-14-013).

Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors Disasters © 2021 ODI.

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