The WHO 2013 oral glucose tolerance test: The utility of isolated glucose measurements - A retrospective cohort study

D. Rademaker*, E. C.M. de Groot, E. S. van den Akker, A. Franx, B. B. van Rijn, J. H. DeVries, S. E. Siegelaar, R. C. Painter

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Objective: The WHO 2013 guidelines recommend screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) by 3-point oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate GDM diagnosed by an isolated high glucose. Study design: We included pregnant women deemed at risk for GDM were offered GDM screening. We examined the records of 1939 consecutively screened pregnancies at two teaching hospitals in Amsterdam during 2016–2020. Using the WHO 2013 diagnostic criteria, we calculated the proportion of GDM cases diagnosed by isolated abnormal glucose values. Results: Among those screened in our high risk cohort, GDM incidence was 31.5%. Of the GDM diagnoses, 57.0% were based on an isolated fasting glucose value, 30.9% based on multiple raised glucose measurements, 7.4% on an isolated raised 2-hour glucose and 4.7% on an isolated raised 1-hour glucose. For 1-hour glucose, the number needed to screen was 67 persons for one additional GDM case. Conclusion: The 1-hour glucose in the 3 point OGTT, as suggested by the WHO 2013 guidelines for GDM, contributes only small numbers of GDM cases and a high number needed to screen (67 for 1 additional case in a selective high risk GDM screening strategy), and is likely even less effective in universally screened populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-375
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Volume296
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2024

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