Time interval between rectal cancer resection and reintervention for anastomotic leakage and the impact of a defunctioning stoma: A Dutch population-based study

Anne Loes K. Warps, Rob A.E.M. Tollenaar, the Dutch ColoRectal Audit, Pieter J. Tanis, Jan Willem T. Dekker*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim:

In the Netherlands, a selective policy of faecal diversion after rectal cancer surgery is generally applied. This study aimed to evaluate the timing, type, and short-term outcomes of reoperation for anastomotic leakage after primary rectal cancer resection stratified for a defunctioning stoma. 

Method:

Data of all patients who underwent primary rectal cancer surgery with primary anastomosis from 2013–2019 were extracted from the Dutch ColoRectal Audit. Primary outcomes were new stoma construction, mortality, ICU admission, prolonged hospital stay, and readmission. 

Results: 

In total, 10,772 rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery with primary anastomosis were included, of whom 46.6% received a primary defunctioning stoma. The reintervention rate for anastomotic leakage was 8.2% and 11.6% for patients with and without a defunctioning stoma (p < 0.001). Reintervention consisted of reoperation in 44.0% and 85.3% (p < 0.001), with a median time interval from primary resection to reoperation of seven days (IQR 4–14) vs. five days (IQR 3–13), respectively. In the presence of a defunctioning stoma, early reoperation (<5 days; n = 47) was associated with significantly more end-colostomy construction (51% vs. 33%) and ICU admission (66% vs. 38%) than late reoperation (≥5 days; n = 127). Without defunctioning stoma, early reoperation (n = 252) was associated with significantly higher mortality (4% vs. 1%), and more ICU admissions (52% vs.34%) than late reoperation (n = 302). 

Conclusions: 

Early reoperations after rectal cancer resection are associated with worse outcomes reflected by a more frequent ICU admission in general, more colostomy construction, and higher mortality in patients with primary defunctioned and nondefunctioned anastomosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2937-2947
Number of pages11
JournalColorectal Disease
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland

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