Trends in incidence, health care consumption, and medical and productivity costs of femoral shaft fractures in the Netherlands between 2005 and 2019

J. Daniël Cnossen, Martien J.M. Panneman, Suzanne Polinder, Michael H.J. Verhofstad, Esther M.M. Van Lieshout*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Introduction: 

Population-based knowledge on the occurrence of femoral shaft fractures is necessary for allocation of health care services, optimization of preventive measures, and research purposes. This nationwide study aimed to provide an overview on the incidence of femoral shaft fractures over a 15-year period and to gain insight into health care consumption and work absence with associated costs in the Dutch population. 

Methods: 

Data of patients who sustained an acute femoral shaft fracture in the years 2005–2019 were extracted from the National Medical Registration of the Dutch Hospital Database. The incidence rate, hospital length of stay (HLOS), direct medical costs, productivity costs, and years lived with disability were calculated for age- and gender specific groups. 

Results: 

A total of 15,847 patients with a femoral shaft fracture were included. The incidence rate increased with 13 % over this 15-year period (5.71/100,000 persons per year in 2005 and 6.47/100,000 in 2019). The mean HLOS per patient was 13.8 days in 2005–2009 versus 8.4 days in 2015–2019 for the entire group. Mean HLOS per patient increased with age (10.0 days for age group 0–9 and 12.7 days for age group >80), but declined over time from 13.6 days in 2005–2009 to 8.8 days in 2015–2019 in males, and from 13.7 days and to 8.2 days, respectively, in females. The costs due to work absence was higher in males. Cumulative health care costs were highest in females >80 years (8.4 million euros versus 1.6 million in males). 

Conclusion: 

The incidence rate of femoral shaft fractures increased over the past 15 years in the Netherlands. Mean HLOS per patient has decreased in all age groups and in both sexes. Health care costs were highest for female octogenarians.

Original languageEnglish
Article number111140
JournalInjury
Volume54
Issue number12
Early online date16 Oct 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

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© 2023 The Author(s)

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