Two different types of sialoadenitis in the NOD- and MRL/lpr mouse models for Sjogren's syndrome: A differential role for dendritic cells in the initiation of sialoadenitis?

Saskia C.A. Van Blokland*, Cornelia G. Van Helden-Meeuwsen, Annet F. Wierenga-Wolf, Hemmo A. Drexhage, Herbert Hooijkaas, Joop P. Van De Merwe, Marjan A. Versnel

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that primarily affects the salivary and lacrimal glands. In these glands, focal lymphocytic infiltrates develop. Little is known about the initiation of this autoimmune disease. Antigen-presenting cells (APC) such as dendritic cells (DC) can play a role in the initiation of autoimmunity. To date, no data on the presence of DC in Sjogren's syndrome are available. Several mouse strains, the nonobese diabetic (NOD) and the MRL/lpr mouse, can be used as models for Sjogren's syndrome. We compared the development of sialoadenitis in the submandibular glands (SMG) of NOD and MRL/lpr mice with particular focus on the presence of APC. DC, macrophages, T cells, and B cells in the SMG were studied by means of immunohistochemistry, after which positively stained cells were quantified. NOD-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were used to study the presence of APC in the SMG in the absence of lymphocytes. Before lymphocytic infiltration, increased numbers of DC were detected in the SMG of NOD mice compared with those numbers in control mice and MRL/lpr mice, which suggests that DC play a role in the initiation of sialoadenitis in NOD mice. In the SMG of NOD mice, lymphocytic infiltrates organized in time. In MRL/lpr mice, however, lymphocytic infiltrates were already organized at the time of appearance. This organization was lost over time. In conclusion, two types of sialoadenitis are described in two mouse models for Sjogren's syndrome. Differences exist with regard to early events that may lead to the development of sialoadenitis and to the composition and organization of inflammatory infiltrates. It is possible that different types of sialoadenitis also exist in humans and that the pathogenetic process in both the early and late phases of the autoimmune reaction differs among patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)575-585
Number of pages11
JournalLaboratory Investigation
Volume80
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2000

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