Update of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS): statistical analysis plan

WF Westendorp, JD Vermeij, Diederik Dippel, MGW Dijkgraaf, T van der Poll, JM Prins, Frederique Vermeij, YBWEM Roos, MC Brouwer, AH Zwinderman, D van de Beek, PJ Nederkoorn

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Abstract

Background: Infections occur in 30% of stroke patients and are associated with unfavorable outcomes. Preventive antibiotic therapy lowers the infection rate after stroke, but the effect of preventive antibiotic treatment on functional outcome in patients with stroke is unknown. The PASS is a multicenter, prospective, phase three, randomized, open-label, blinded end-point (PROBE) trial of preventive antibiotic therapy in acute stroke. Patients are randomly assigned to either ceftriaxone at a dose of 2 g, given every 24 h intravenously for 4 days, in addition to standard stroke-unit care, or standard stroke-unit care without preventive antibiotic therapy. The aim of this study is to assess whether preventive antibiotic treatment improves functional outcome at 3 months by preventing infections. This paper presents in detail the statistical analysis plan (SAP) of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS) and was submitted while the investigators were still blinded for all outcomes. Results: The primary outcome is the score on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), assessed by ordinal logistic regression analysis according to a proportional odds model. Secondary analysis of the primary outcome is the score on the mRS dichotomized as a favorable outcome (mRS 0 to 2) versus unfavorable outcome (mRS 3 to 6). Secondary outcome measures are death rate at discharge and 3 months, infection rate during hospital admission, length of hospital admission, volume of post-stroke care, use of antibiotics during hospital stay, quality-adjusted life years and costs. Complications of treatment, serious adverse events (SAEs) and suspected unexpected serious adverse reactions (SUSARs) are reported as safety outcomes. Conclusions: The data from PASS will establish whether preventive antibiotic therapy in acute stroke improves functional outcome by preventing infection and will be analyzed according to this pre-specified SAP.
Original languageUndefined/Unknown
JournalTrials
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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