Uptake of community health care provision by community health entrepreneurs for febrile illness and diarrhoea: a cross-sectional survey in rural communities in Bunyangabu district, Uganda

Marinka van der Hoeven, Monique van Lettow*, Pien Boonstra, Trynke Hoekstra, Elizeus Rutebemberwa, Raymond Tweheyo, Maarten Olivier Kok

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the uptake of services provided by community health workers who were trained as community health entrepreneurs (CHEs) for febrile illness and diarrhoea. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey among households combined with mapping of all providers of basic medicine and primary health services in the study area. PARTICIPANTS: 1265 randomly selected households in 15 rural villages with active CHEs. SETTING: Bunyangabu district, Uganda. OUTCOME MEASURES: We describe the occurrence and care sought for fever and diarrhoea in the last 3 months by age group in the households. Care provider options included: CHE, health centre or clinic (public or private), pharmacy, drug shop and other. Geographic Information Ssystem (GIS)-based geographical measures were used to map all care providers around the active CHEs. RESULTS: Fever and diarrhoea in the last 3 months occurred most frequently in children under 5; 68% and 41.9%, respectively. For those who sought care, CHE services were used for fever among children under 5, children 5-17 and adults over 18 years of age in 34.7%, 29.9% and 25.1%, respectively. For diarrhoea among children under 5, children 5-17 and adults over 18 years of age, CHE services were used in 22.1%, 19.5% and 7.0%, respectively. For those who did not seek care from a CHE (only), drug shops were most frequently used services for both fever and diarrhoea, followed by health centres or private clinics. Many households used a combination of services, which was possible given the high density and diversity of providers found in the study area. CONCLUSIONS: CHEs play a considerable role in providing care in rural areas where they are active. The high density of informal drug shops and private clinics highlights the need for clarity on the de facto roles played by different providers in both the public and private sector to improve primary healthcare.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere074393
JournalBMJ open
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Feb 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2024.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Uptake of community health care provision by community health entrepreneurs for febrile illness and diarrhoea: a cross-sectional survey in rural communities in Bunyangabu district, Uganda'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this