Visual selective attention and visual search performance in children with CVI, ADHD, and Dyslexia: a scoping review

Marinke J. Hokken*, Elise Krabbendam, Ymie J. van der Zee, Marlou J. G. Kooiker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Visual selective attention refers to the selection of relevant visual elements in a scene whilst ignoring irrelevant visual elements. Visual Selective Attention Dysfunctions (VSAD) are prevalent in children with Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Dyslexia. An important issue in the pediatric neuropsychological practice is how to discriminate between the task performance of these populations. We conducted a scoping review of the literature on visual search performance (VSP) in children with CVI, ADHD, and Dyslexia, aged 6-12 years. After a systematic selection process, 35 studies were included. Results suggest that all patient groups have some degree of impaired VSP compared to typically developing children. Children with CVI tend to react slower and less accurately. VSP impairments in children with ADHD are characterized by poor accuracy rather than reaction time. Children with Dyslexia tend to be slower and less accurate, depending on stimulus type. Besides VSAD, it is argued that other neurocognitive mechanisms might influence VSP, such as speed-accuracy trade-off or an executive functioning deficit in ADHD and a phonological deficit in Dyslexia. This paper further discusses the differences and similarities in visual search performance between the groups. The sparse data in children with an official diagnosis of CVI and the technical inconclusive data on children with ADHD and Dyslexia demonstrate complexity of discriminating between these populations in clinical practice based on VSP. New and more quantitative VSP parameters, such as eye tracking-based measures, may contribute to a refined classification among CVI, ADHD, and Dyslexia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-390
Number of pages34
JournalChild Neuropsychology
Volume29
Issue number3
Early online dateApr 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Apr 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The work was supported by the Visio Foundation [OI0399066]. We thank L.J. Slik for her assistance with the systematic review. The current review is part of the research project ‘visual selective attention disorders in children ’, which is a collaboration by Koninklijke Visio (Royal Dutch Visio) and Erasmus MC. Financial support for this study was provided by Visio Foundation, a Dutch non-profit organization providing financial support to (research) projects that improve the quality of life of individuals with a visual impairment (www.visiofoundation.org).

Funding Information:
We thank L.J. Slik for her assistance with the systematic review. The current review is part of the research project ‘visual selective attention disorders in children’, which is a collaboration by Koninklijke Visio (Royal Dutch Visio) and Erasmus MC. Financial support for this study was provided by Visio Foundation, a Dutch non-profit organization providing financial support to (research) projects that improve the quality of life of individuals with a visual impairment ( www.visiofoundation.org ).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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