Visually guided movement with increasing time-on-task: Differential effects on movement preparation and movement execution

András Matuz, Dimitri van der Linden, András Zsidó, Árpád Csathó*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Top-down cognitive control seems to be sensitive to the detrimental effects of fatigue induced by time-on-task (ToT). The planning and preparation of the motor responses may be especially vulnerable to ToT. Yet, effects of ToT specific to the different phases of movements have received little attention. Therefore, in three experiments, we assessed the effect of ToT on a mouse-pointing task. In Experiment 1, there were 16 possible target positions with variable movement directions. In Experiment 2, the layout of the targets was simplified. In Experiment 3, using cuing conditions, we examined whether the effects of ToT on movement preparation and execution were caused by an increased orientation deficit or decreased phasic alertness. In each experiment, initiation of movement (preparatory phase) became slower, movement execution became faster and overall response time remained constant with increasing ToT. There was, however, no significant within-person association between the preparatory and execution phases. In Experiments 1 and 2, we found a decreasing movement time/movement error ratio, suggesting a more impulsive execution of the pointing movement. In addition, ToT was also accompanied with imprecise movement execution as indicated by the increased errors, mainly in Experiment 2. The results of Experiment 3 indicated that ToT did not induce orientation and phasic alerting deficits but rather was accompanied by decreased tonic alertness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)565-582
Number of pages18
JournalQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Volume75
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Oct 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Visually guided movement with increasing time-on-task: Differential effects on movement preparation and movement execution'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this