Visuals at work in the criminal justice system: better access to justice

J Willink, Gabry Vanderveen

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterAcademic

Abstract

New technologies have led to an increase in visuals in the legal system. Different types of visuals are created by various public and private actors, including NGOs, governmental institutions and companies. Drawings, and interactive infographics can be used in different stages in the civil or criminal justice system to enhance comprehension and understanding. In November 2018, a working conference is organised, to bring researchers, (legal) professionals, practitioners and businesses together to discuss how visuals actually work in the legal system, how they affect the people involved. Visuals can lead to more inclusion and better access to justice. Visualizations of data and information can lead to better understanding and comprehension, and can help to remember things that have happened. They can enable justice, the access to justice and to legal information. Visualizations can help children, less literate or (functionally) illiterate people, non-native speakers and people with a cognitive disability to understand legal rights, legal processes and outcomes. This development creates opportunities for business, artists and (legal) designers, though legal visualization, legal design and visual legal communication necessitates the transformation of law schools and law firms. The question is when and how visualization of information and data can lead to more inclusion by enhancing access to justice and to legal information.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Event18th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology - Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina
Duration: 1 Jan 2018 → …

Conference

Conference18th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology
CitySarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina
Period1/01/18 → …

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