What gets published and what doesn’t? Exploring optimal distinctiveness and diverse expectations in entrepreneurship articles

Marie Madeleine Meurer*, Maksim Belitski, Christian Fisch, Roy Thurik

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The field of entrepreneurship has seen remarkable growth, increasing the expectations of academic audiences. Articles need to balance novelty with rigorous methodology, theoretical contributions, social implications, and coherent argumentation to succeed in the publication process. However, navigating these varied and sometimes conflicting expectations to achieve optimal distinctiveness in academic narratives is challenging for authors. To explore how authors can achieve optimal distinctiveness amidst these complex expectations, we studied academic narratives and related editorial decisions of two leading entrepreneurship journals, Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice (ETP, 4,151 papers) and Small Business Economics Journal (SBEJ, 4,043 papers), using computer-aided text analysis. Our study debunks common assumptions about what makes a successful entrepreneurship paper, providing an empirical basis for understanding actual versus perceived publication requisites. Furthermore, we extend optimal distinctiveness theory by demonstrating that high distinctiveness is not uniformly advantageous, meeting numerous expectations is not necessarily beneficial, and clear language is crucial for complex narratives. Our study underscores that crafting narratives is more nuanced than traditionally believed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSmall Business Economics
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 Feb 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright: © The Author(s) 2024.

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