What is it like to be the object of research? On meaning making in self-report measurement and validity of data in psychotherapy research

Femke Truijens, Melissa Miléna De Smet, Martijn Vandevoorde, Mattias Desmet, Reitske Meganck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we argue (1) that self-report measurement is meaningful. ‘John’, a patient-participant in psychotherapy research, is presented to illustrate meaning-making processes in self-report measurement. We show that neglecting individual scoring processes might lead to invalidation of data. Therefore, (2) we argue that it is vital to actively validate data collected by validated measures. As numerical data themselves do not ‘show’ whether they are valid, the story of data collection must be taken into account. Therefore, we argue that mixing qualitative and quantitative methods is necessary for meaningful measurement, which is paramount to progress in psychological science and practice.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100118
JournalMethods in Psychology
Volume8
Early online date2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We would like to express our gratitude to all researchers, therapists, and patient-participants involved in the Ghent Psychotherapy Study. We are grateful for the constructive feedback of the anonymous reviewers and editors, and to Phyllis Illari, Uljana Feest, and the audience at conferences by the Society for Psychotherapy Research and CiNaPS, for their enthusiasm and support to publication of this research and philosophy. We thank the Flanders Research Foundation for supporting our co-author dr. De Smet (nr. 1220521N). Most importantly, we thank ‘John’ for his participation and honesty as patient-participant in the Ghent Psychotherapy Study.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Authors

Research programs

  • ESSB PSY

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