Word recognition is affected by the meaning of orthographic neighbours: Evidence from semantic decision tasks

Inge Boot*, Diane Pecher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many models of word recognition predict that neighbours of target words will be activated during word processing. Cascaded models can make the additional prediction that semantic features of those neighbours get activated before the target has been uniquely identified. In two semantic decision tasks neighbours that were congruent (i.e., from the same category) or incongruent (i.e., from the opposite category) were presented in a long-term priming paradigm. Performance to targets was better if they were primed by congruent neighbours than if they were primed by incongruent neighbours. The same effect was found for rhyming and nonrhyming primes. The results support cascaded models that allow semantic information to become activated before lexical selection has finished.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-393
Number of pages19
JournalLanguage and Cognitive Processes
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Correspondence should be addressed to Inge Boot, Psychology Department, T12-34, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Postbus 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands. E-mail: i.boot@fsw.eur.nl This research was supported by a grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) to Diane Pecher. We would like to thank René Zeelenberg for useful discussions.

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